Please, don’t “Work the World”

When I stopped a student from suturing a man’s arm back together, I knew something was horribly wrong. He had never dealt with patients. He was 21, from England, and in his second year of a medical degree. But Richard had decided to come to Dar es Salaam in Tanzania, to the hospital where I had been working for a few months, so he could advance his medical career. He, like many hundreds of students from the UK, was capitalising on the opportunities provided by Work the World and subsequent work experience providers. He, like so many students from the…

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